African Feminisms CFP 2016/17

African feminisms have, from the beginning, been grounded in an inclusive and intersectional discourse which seeks to challenge and unravel patriarchal, political, existential, and philosophical imbalances in society. As such they have been instrumental in bringing into question some of the ‘blind spots’ and prejudices embedded in Western feminisms. In light of current debates on decolonisation and the continued interest in intersectional politics in the global sphere, Finding Africa invites researchers to propose papers which centre on the theme of African feminisms in any field of the humanities.

Accepted submissions from the UK will comprise the lineup of the next round of seminars co-hosted with the University of Leeds’ Centre for African Studies (LUCAS) in 2017. A second call for submissions from South Africa will be made shortly.

Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

Intersectionality and African Feminisms

Womanism in Contemporary African Feminism

The Future of African Feminisms

Human Rights and African Feminism

African Feminisms and Curricula

Contemporary African Feminisms

African Feminisms in the West

Philosophy and African Feminisms

African Feminist Manifestos

The Psychology of African Feminisms

African Feminist Literature

African Feminisms and Disability

Guide for authors:

All submissions should be 250 word abstracts in Word format emailed to findingpocoafrica@gmail.com  by 20 November 2016.

*For further details on our activities, click on the seminars section on the main menu*

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Liberating the Female Voice from the Patriarchal Order of the South African Pastoral Tradition: Anne Landsman’s The Devil’s Chimney by Ruth Daly

6308201._UY200_The next Finding Africa seminar, hosted in association with the University of Leeds’ Centre for African Studies (LUCAS), will be on 24 May 2016. Ruth Daly will present a reading of Anne Landsman’s The Devil’s Chimney in her paper titled ‘Liberating the Female Voice from the Patriarchal Order of the South African Pastoral Tradition’.

The seminar will take place on 24 May 2016 at 4pm in Seminar Room 1 of the Leeds Humanities Research Institute (physical address: 31-2 Clarendon Place, Leeds). Entrance is free and all are welcome. Continue reading

On the African Intellectual Mobilities Colloquium

Rebecca Jones ‘We need new critical paradigms’: Reflections on researching a literary history of Yoruba travel writing’ © Imke van Heerden
Rebecca Jones ‘We need new critical paradigms’: Reflections on researching a literary history of Yoruba travel writing’ © Imke van Heerden

Finding Africa is delighted to have had the opportunity to co-host and participate in the recent colloquium of African Intellectual Mobilities at the University of York. Centred around a questioning and broadening of the travel writing genre and the movements of writers, the colloquium registered the significance and extent of travel writing by African and black diaspora authors and intellectuals. Such a revisiting of the genre reveals the potential for research that seeks to reposition travel and the many types of texts and voices that have been marginalised within this tradition of writing.

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Richard Stupart to speak on Compassion Fatigue, the ‘CNN Effect’ and the Need for Better Media-Humanitarian Theory

Richard Stupart
Richard Stupart (Universität Erfurt)

The next seminar in the Journalism and Media Studies stream of Finding Africa will be presented by Richard Stupart from Universität Erfurt, Germany.

Stupart is a freelance photojournalist, researcher, writer and videographer with a particular focus on the intersection between narratives of Africa and development assistance. He previously completed an MA analysing the understandings present in coverage of the 2011/12 Somalia famine, and is currently studying towards a second Masters in Public Policy and conflict at the Willy Brandt School of Public Policy at Universität Erfurt.

Stupart’s current academic interests include the intersection of media and development, data gathering/processing in conflict areas, and the effects of violence and representation on legitimacy. Stupart also writes at his own blog, richardstupart.com, and has contributed work to CNNGo, Matador Network, Timeline, Good Men Project, City Press (South Africa) and other assorted publications on topics ranging from    travel to aid, voluntourism and race.

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Finding Africa: Postcolonial African Studies Seminar Series

tumblr_static_89v5y9ukg64ggc0c8wc0g8kc8Finding Africa: Postcolonial African Studies Seminar Series facilitates interdisciplinary talks by researchers working in the fields of literature, film, history, sociology, politics, women’s studies, anthropology, psychology, and human rights. Although hosted by the University of Leeds’ School of English, the seminar series features academics from York, York St. John, Leeds, Bradford, Durham, Sheffield, Hull and Newcastle universities.

Existing partners include the University of Leeds’ Centre for African Studies (LUCAS), the Northern Postcolonial Network (Universities of Salford and Manchester), the University of Manchester’s Postcolonial Reading Group, and the Stellenbosch Literary Project.

The seminar series is committed to providing a platform for researchers and interested others to share knowledge, open up questions, and explore issues relevant to postcolonial Africa. The Finding Africa blog also welcomes contributions from writers, artists, journalists, publishers and others with an abiding interest in Africa and seeks to expand the scope of conversations in the academy.

Finding Africa’s latest partnership with Stellenbosch Literary Project housed within the English Department at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa is the first of many connections which form part of our commitment to building a cross-continental dialogue in and about Africa.